With the 143rd running of the Kentucky Derby taking place Saturday, Onion Sports looks back on some of the most notable horses in the history of the sport.


Man o’ War

Revolutionized racing by becoming the first horse to run on four legs instead of the traditional two

Advertisement


Sunday Silence

Won the 1989 Kentucky Derby despite going on a cocaine-fueled bender with New York Mets star Keith Hernandez the night before.

Advertisement


War Admiral

Winning the Triple Crown in 1937 at the height of the Great Depression, War Admiral inspired millions of Americans who dreamed of living in quarters as luxurious as his stable

Advertisement


Curlin

Despite earning more than $10 million during his illustrious racing career, the chestnut stallion couldn’t outrun lavish spending habits and filed for bankruptcy in 2013

Advertisement


Seattle Slew

A Triple Crown winner, Seattle Slew was euthanized by the Gambino crime family in 1980 after refusing to fix a race

Advertisement


American Pharaoh

The product of a rich lineage whose members include such champions as Empire Maker, Unbridled, and Terry Bradshaw

Advertisement


Prince Rose

This European-bred specimen holds the distinction of being Belgium’s best and only horse

Advertisement


Unbridled

The 1990 Kentucky Derby champion experienced a meteoric fall from grace when an Outside The Lines report revealed he had fathered 437 offspring with 437 different mothers

Advertisement


Secretariat

The famous stallion’s record in the one and a half mile is mostly attributed to the use of a now banned full-body polyurethane race suit

Advertisement


Citation

The thoroughbred’s 1948 Triple Crown victory only compounded his owner’s regret that he gave his horse such a shitty name

Advertisement


Dust Commander

Quickly faded from the spotlight only to resurface years later working as a hansom cab in Central Park

Advertisement


Tick Tock

Controversially boycotted the 1990 Belmont Stakes as a demonstration against the escalation of The Gulf War

Advertisement


Khartoum

This prize stud went on to sire four Kentucky Derby winners before being discovered decapitated by owner and longtime Hollywood studio mogul Jack Woltz in 1945

Advertisement